Recommendations

Exploring Hispanic Heritage Month with Your Children

  • Posted on: 29 September 2020
  • By: Jon Schafle

National Hispanic Heritage Month runs from September 15th to October 15th and is a time when the United States celebrates the contributions and influences of Hispanic Americans have made to the history and culture of the country. It's a wonderful opportunity to teach your children about your own Hispanic roots or to learn about another culture. I was exposed to lots of great Mexican art, music, and culture growing up in California and have put together some suggests to share beyond.

Two Librarians Walk Into a Shelf Episode 8 Show Notes

  • Posted on: 25 September 2020
  • By: Michelle Brightwell

In episode 8 of the podcast, Rob and Michelle discuss materials written by authors who came to their subject or their craft in interesting ways. Come for the discussion about books, but stay for the first edition of The Library Game, and a story about wasps at the library!

You might recognize the name Deborah Goodrich Royce from movies and TV, but she’s published her first book, the suspense thriller, Finding Mrs. Ford. Monster, She Wrote is a nonfiction book about all of the women who pioneered the horror and speculative fiction genre. Why Fish Don't Exist is a memoir weaved with the nonfiction tale of a biologist who became obsessive over his work.

Italian Chills and Thrills for Halloween

  • Posted on: 24 September 2020
  • By: Robert Freese

Italian Chills and Thrills for Halloween

At one time, a great deal of films came into the United States for distribution to drive-ins from all over the world. Italy was one of the major countries to export genre films for double and triple features at ozoners across the country. For decades, Italian films of all types graced the giant outdoor screens, as well as hardtops, from the mid '50s through the early ‘80s, but where all but gone by the mid ‘90s.

The Superhero I Did Not Realize I Needed

  • Posted on: 17 September 2020
  • By: Adrienne Bone

If someone asked me 3 years ago, "Who's your favorite superhero?" I would respond, "Batman, of course." The reason being, he is a regular guy without "superpowers," intelligent, rich, handsome, mysterious, the strong silent type, a man-of-few-words. Haha.

However, someone has taken Batman's place as my favorite superhero. Someone who has had an impact on people not just in comics as Black Panther but in real life-- that someone is Chadwick Boseman.

I know everyone has written, spoken, and posted about Chadwick Boseman's departure from us. I am still saddened and more likely will continue to be for a while. The thing is he represents what I wish of myself and others could be. You can tell he cared about his craft and wanted to tell the stories of the characters he portrayed.

Podcast Episode 6 Show Notes - Books and Movies that Inspired us

  • Posted on: 14 September 2020
  • By: Michelle Brightwell

In our 6th Episode, Rob and Michelle discuss some books and movies that have inspired them in some way. Give the podcast a go and hear the story behind Rob's picture with movie director Dan O'Bannon! As promised, here's the picture!

 

 

 

 

 

Materials Discussed in the show:

Psycho II by Robert Bloch

The Tired Parent’s Guide to Storytime

  • Posted on: 20 August 2020
  • By: Connie Chow

I am here to lay some truth on you about how a tired parent reads to her child at the end of a long day. Sometimes when your day is 8 hours of work, meal prep x 3, drinking 64 ounces of water, and attempting those recommended 10,000 steps, you have nothing left in you except lots of water. The library has two library digital resources, Hoopla Digital and BookFlix, that will help you reclaim your time and supplement your bedtime ritual with an entertaining story.

Celebrate the centennial of women’s suffrage in the U.S. with two exhibits at the Downtown Library

  • Posted on: 13 August 2020
  • By: Lauren Lucas

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2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment, granting that no one could be denied the right to vote because of their sex. Could women vote before the 19th amendment? Yes, but not in every state.  Could all women in America vote after the 19th amendment? No, immigrants, Puerto Ricans, and women of color could still be denied the right to vote.  The movement to give all women the right began a lifetime before it was ratified in 1920 and continued to go on for decades still. This history and the stories of the men and women who fought to bring us this right are well documented in our collection. 

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